Category

Express Entry

FSTP vs FSWP

FSWP or FSTP – Which Canadian Immigration program is the best fit for you?

By | Blog, Express Entry | No Comments

The Federal Skilled Worker (FSWP) and the Federal Skilled Trades Programs (FSTP) are the two well-known immigration programs for Canada. Both the programs are a part of the Express Entry system along with the Canadian Experience Class (CEC).

The two Canadian immigration programs, i.e. Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) and Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP), may be confusing for most applicants who do not understand the similarities and differences between the two. This blog would help you understand both the programs closely and determine which one is the best fit for you.

FSTP vs FSWP

Individuals will, in general, combine these two programs. There is a difference in the eligibility criteria of the federal skilled worker (FSW) and that of the federal skilled trades (FST) program. The immigration procedure for preparing the two programs’ application is electronic and depends on a point-based system. As these programs are part of Express Entry, applicants who rank higher in the comprehensive ranking system (CRS) are issued an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for Canada PR.

For obtaining the Canada PR, one must qualify for the federal skilled worker points system. The federal skilled eligibility criteria include the applicant’s education, work experience, and language requirements.

Now some of you may ask what Express Entry Pool is? The applicants who are willing to move to Canada make an online profile. If they qualify for one of Canada’s immigration programs, they enter the Express Entry Pool.

In the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP), an individual must have –

  • At least 12 months’ work experience in the last ten years.
  • Only paid work is considered, and voluntary or unpaid work is not considered.
  • The job has to belong to one of the NOC skill levels 0, A or B.

If you did an all-day work, it must be equivalent to 30 hours of the week for a year, equal to 1,560 hours consistently. If it was a part-time job, it should be 15 hours out of each week for two years, equivalent to 1,560 hours. If one qualifies these requirements, he/she would be able for the federal skilled worker points system.

Whereas, in Federal Skills Trade Program (FSTP), the necessities are referenced underneath –

  • You should plan to live anyplace in Canada except for Quebec.
  • You should meet the necessary level of language requirement either in English or French.
  • You should have two years of full time or equivalent measure of part-time experience in the five years before applying under Express Entry.
  • You should meet the job requirements as it is mentioned in NOC.
  • You should have a full-time employment offer for at least one year.

As a candidate, you must show that you precisely performed the responsibilities at your job, as mentioned in the National Occupation Classification (NOC) list. If you neglect to show the obligations and experience for the employment you did as it is mentioned in the NOC, your immigration application won’t be acknowledged.

Similarities – Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) and Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP)

  • Can apply under Express Entry System (If you meet all eligibility criteria).
  • Having an employment offer is not a must but will definitely increase your score and chances to rank high in the draw pool.
  • No age barrier (If you are aged more than 47, you do not earn CRS points).
  • Submit proof of funds (Can score extra for adaptability/how can you manage to settle in Canada).
  • Can apply to work and reside in the province (Expect Quebec as Quebec has its skilled worker program).

Differences – Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) and Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP)

Criteria FSWP FSTP
Language Skills  For the first language minimum level of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) and Niveaux de Competence Linguistique Canadien (NCLC) is 7, whereas, for the second language, it should be Level 5. For first or second language, the minimum level of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) should be Level 4 for Reading and Writing and level 5 for Speaking and Listening.
Education Certificate, Degree or Diploma from Canadian secondary or post-secondary institution; or Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) from a designated organization of your secondary or post-secondary institution (outside of Canada). No education requirements, but having one can improve your CRS score and rank in the Express Entry system pool (therefore, one needs to have an ECA).
Work Experience  Minimum of 1-year full-time, uninterrupted work experience in the last ten years under-skilled occupation skill level A or B or skill type 0; or Canadian job offer following the Labour Impact Assessment criteria Minimum of 2 years of full-time, uninterrupted work experience in the last ten years under one of the following groups:
• Major Group 72 – Electrical, construction, industrial trades
• Major Group 73: maintenance and equipment operation trades
• Major Group 82 – supervisors and technical jobs in natural resources, agriculture and related production
• Major Group 92 – processing, manufacturing and utility supervisors and central control operators
• Minor Group 632 – chefs and cooks
• Minor Group 633 – butchers and bakers

If you need additional information about the Federal Skilled Worker Program and the Federal Skilled Trades Program or are willing to apply for it, you can connect with Elaar Immigration for all your Canada immigration necessities. Our group of committed and licensed Canada immigration consultants will guide you in the right direction as per your unique situation.

canada immigration

IRCC Issues New Guidelines for ‘Dual Intent’ for Overseas Spousal Sponsorship Applicants

By | Blog, Express Entry, Immigration | No Comments

The Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) declared its new guidelines for dual intent on 30th October 2020. The news was about dual intent program delivery instructions for partners and spouses who have applied or may apply for Canada PR as a sponsored partner or spouse. According to Canadian immigration law, dual intent refers to the foreign nationals who can seek temporary residence and permanent residence in Canada at the same time. The news explains what factors the immigration officers will undergo while accessing the sponsored spouses’ dual intent application. Dual intent is also applicable to the individuals who have applied for TRV.

Dual intent is available when an individual has applied or may apply for Canada PR. It also applies to enter Canada for a specific duration on a temporary visa as a student, visitor, or temporary worker.

canada immigration

More clear rules for dual intent will probably help many existing students, visitors, and temporary worker who is willing to make Canada their home by gaining Canada PR, especially given the way that numerous Canadian immigration programs (programs to obtain Canada PR) reward people who have a Canadian degree or work experience in Canada.

If the Canadian immigration official has concerns or questions about the candidate’s dual intent application, the official must make the candidate aware of these worries. After this, they can offer the candidate a chance to react to the worries. If temporary residence application is not approved, the official will furnish the candidate with a letter clarifying why the application is rejected.

In evaluating an application for temporary residence, immigration officials are told to consider different factors such as:

  • The total duration that an individual will spend in Canada;
  • Means of support;
  • Commitments and ties to the nation of origin;
  • The reason to stay in Canada;
  • The credibility and validity of documents, reports and data submitted;
  • Past consistence with prerequisites of the IRPA and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR) that apply to temporary residents (students, visitors, and workers), and data accessible in biometric and biographic information sharing.

If the temporary resident candidates do not show that they have the aim of leaving Canada, and the official just considers their objective to reside in Canada by obtaining Canada PR, their application will not be approved. Regardless of whether the candidate may consequently fit for Canadian Experience Class (CEC) or a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP). The purpose behind this, IRCC says, is because the candidate has not demonstrated that they would regard the terms of temporary residence, should they be not fit for obtaining Canada PR.

Canada immigration officials will utilize their judgment on applications with dual intent; however, the Global Case Management System notes should unmistakably exhibit the official’s thinking while applying. At the end of the day, if dual intent was considered a component of choice on the application, it should be written in the candidate’s file.

Having two purposes — one for temporary residence and one for permanent residence — is authentic. Canada’s IRCC states: “An aim by a foreign national to obtain Canada PR does not disqualify them from becoming a temporary resident if the Canadian immigration official is contented that they will leave Canada by the end of the period authorized for their stay.”

× How can I help you?

Discover your Canadian immigration options. Get your free assessment now!